nprfreshair:

New York City from space.
(via Gizmodo)

nprfreshair:

New York City from space.

(via Gizmodo)

brownspaceman:

#Auroras on #Saturn are huge (760 x bigger than Earth) and beautiful. The Hubble took this photo in ultra-violet so it appears to look blue but is actually red due to its hydrogen atmosphere. #astronomy #space


Planetary rings are amazing…

brownspaceman:

#Auroras on #Saturn are huge (760 x bigger than Earth) and beautiful. The Hubble took this photo in ultra-violet so it appears to look blue but is actually red due to its hydrogen atmosphere. #astronomy #space

Planetary rings are amazing…

202 notessaturnringsspaceaurora

staceythinx:

Stunning star trails by Alex Cherney in Victoria, Australia.

joshsternberg:

Double rainbow seen from space.
(Image: NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE MODIS Rapid Response)
From NewScientist:

The glories are caused by diffraction of light back towards its source. The layer of stratocumulus clouds normally reflects a portion of solar energy into space and in this image the clouds are diffracting the sunlight back to the satellite splitting the light into its constituent colours. It has been suggested that enhancing the reflective property of stratocumulus clouds through geoengineering could help negate climate change. These glories look to us like the famous “double rainbow all across the sky” captured in Yosemite.

h/t Kristin Butler.

and triple hurricanes… 

joshsternberg:

Double rainbow seen from space.

(Image: NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE MODIS Rapid Response)

From NewScientist:

The glories are caused by diffraction of light back towards its source. The layer of stratocumulus clouds normally reflects a portion of solar energy into space and in this image the clouds are diffracting the sunlight back to the satellite splitting the light into its constituent colours. It has been suggested that enhancing the reflective property of stratocumulus clouds through geoengineering could help negate climate change. These glories look to us like the famous “double rainbow all across the sky” captured in Yosemite.

h/t Kristin Butler.

and triple hurricanes… 

smithsonianmag:

Stunning Star Trail Photographs from International Space Station

NASA astronaut Don Pettit recently uploaded a gallery of photos to the Johnson Space Center’s Flickr page. Pettit on how he captured these amazing images:

“My star trail images are made by taking a time exposure of about 10 to 15 minutes. However, with modern digital cameras, 30 seconds is about the longest exposure possible, due to electronic detector noise effectively snowing out the image. To achieve the longer exposures I do what many amateur astronomers do. I take multiple 30-second exposures, the ‘stack’ them using imaging software, thus producing the longer exposure.”

Ed note: Here are the Hubble Space Telescope’s finest photos.

h/t Twisted Sifter

Gorgeous! 

newsweek:

nwkarchivist:

U.S. Space Shuttle Program, 1981-2012

Miss u, Discovery.

geekfeed:

ISS Crew can clearly see the border between India and Pakistan, because of special security lighting. -NASA  画

Is this what the GOP envisions for the Mex-USA border?

geekfeed:

ISS Crew can clearly see the border between India and Pakistan, because of special security lighting. -NASA 

Is this what the GOP envisions for the Mex-USA border?

I never got to see a shuttle launch live. It’s been on my TODO since I was 8 or so… I hope we see an opportunity where this program comes back. 
soupsoup:

Photo via Robert Scoble

I never got to see a shuttle launch live. It’s been on my TODO since I was 8 or so… I hope we see an opportunity where this program comes back. 

soupsoup:

Photo via Robert Scoble

Shot in Mauna Kea, Hawaii of space, this time-lapse is Charles Leung’s first video.  Nice work.

You probably have seen the famous photo of Earth taken by the crew of Apollo 17 in 1972, which shows most of Antarctica, Africa and the Saudi Arabian peninsula. Well, we can add more amazing photographs to the ‘Blue Marble’ series. NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center has released these beautiful images to the public, showing gorgeous detail of our planet.

This spectacular “blue marble” image is the most detailed true-color image of the entire Earth to date. Using a collection of satellite-based observations, scientists and visualizers stitched together months of observations of the land surface, oceans, sea ice, and clouds into a seamless, true-color mosaic of every square kilometer (.386 square mile) of our planet. These images are freely available to educators, scientists, museums, and the public. This record includes preview images and links to full resolution versions up to 21,600 pixels across.

Photos by Goddard Photo and Video Blog.

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